U.S. Department of Energy

    Library Patrons in New York Check-Out Renewable Energy

    January 11, 2012

    In a hamlet on the Hudson River in upstate New York, two newly installed photovoltaic arrays at the local library are generating electricity, interest in renewable energy, and community pride. Recognizing its role as an educator and community leader, the Esopus Library used a $96,790 award from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to install the 22.5-kW roof-mounted and 5.5-kW ground-mounted photovoltaic systems.

    "We're hoping to be a place to come to learn about renewable energy," said Library Director Kelly Tomaseski. "We think that people will be more likely to invest in a similar project if they can see it in practice."

    These sentiments are shared by Adam Rizzo, president of Solar Liberty, the project installation firm. "Community centers, nonprofit buildings, and schools are especially important for promoting solar energy. Seeing is believing." The new solar system is expected to generate approximately 31,200 kilowatt-hours of electricity annually—approximately 30% of the library’s electricity use and a savings of $4,000 in energy costs each year. Read the full story on DOE's Energy Blog.